Waikato Journal of Education

Abstract

This paper discusses some of the data produced in the course of a research study that examined the perceptions that primary school aged children (7-13 year olds) had about their learning in health education. The study explored children's knowledge about their own health, their issues and concerns about health and health education and what they thought they should be learning about in health education at school. The research used mixed methods to collect data and several themes emerged that were central to listening to children and gaining their perceptions. The importance of understanding children and taking time to listen to what they were saying was the major theme and also the negation of children's views in favour of adult agendas. This study has shown that children have opinions and they also have something to say, and that what they have to say is worth listening to. Moreover, children possess knowledge that can contribute to classroom health lessons and health curriculum design.
https://doi.org/10.15663/wje.v10i1.334
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